Prevention Partnerships Program

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The Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation’s Prevention Partnership Program aims to help prevent and reduce gambling-related harm within local communities across Victoria.


New funding for 2017-2019 program now open

Applications for grants within the Prevention Partnerships Program 2017-19 are now open until 14 March 2017.

We are looking for programs and initiatives that test new ideas and deliver prevention activities to at-risk populations across Victoria, building the evidence for effective practice in the prevention of gambling harm.

The program has a total of $4 million funding available over two years from 2017-2019.

Applications for grants are welcome from community, not for profit organisations, social enterprise, local government or public health organisations.

View the current projects funded within the foundation’s 2015-2017 program.

How to apply

Please read the funding guidelines outlined below to find out more and how to apply. The guidelines are also available to download as a PDF.

Downloads

Part A - Funding guidelines (PDF - 1134.6 KB)

Part B - Applicant response (DOC - 1747.5 KB)

Prevention Partnership Program workshops

On the 20 and 22 February, the foundation held two informative and interactive events for groups that are interested in applying for the grants. Find out more about the Prevention Partnership Program Workshops here.

Funding guidelines

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About the program

The Prevention Partnership Program

The Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation’s Prevention Partnership Program (the program) aims to help prevent and reduce gambling-related harm within communities across Victoria.

The program has a total of $4 million funding available over two years from 2017-2019 and applications are open from 6 February to 14 March 2017.

Applications for grants are welcome from not for profit organisations, social enterprise, local government and community or public health organisations. We are looking for programs andinitiatives that test new ideas and deliver prevention activities to at-risk populations across Victoria, building the evidence for effective practice in the prevention of gambling harm.

The program is part of the foundation’s ongoing commitment to preventing gambling harm in the community, and has a focus on new and innovative approaches, as well as projects that feature collaborative partnerships.

Applicants from a wide range of sectors are encouraged to apply, in the knowledge that harm from gambling can impact on many aspects of life for individuals, families and community.

Organisations wishing to apply will need to demonstrate how their project idea avoids duplication of existing prevention and community education activities, in particular those presently funded by the foundation. You can find out more about the foundation’s existing awareness and prevention programs at http://www.responsiblegambling.vic.gov.au/awareness-and-prevention

Important dates

Activity

Date

Applications open

6 February 2017

Prevention Partnership Program workshops

20 and 22 February 2017

Applications close

5:00 PM AEDT

14 March 2017

Notifications to successful and unsuccessful applicants

Early June 2017

Funding commences

1 July 2017

Six funding streams

Applicants will need to demonstrate how their project objectives align with at least one of the following six streams of funding. Projects may align with more than one stream.

  • Interrupts the normalisation of gambling.
  • Builds social connectedness and community resilience, to prevent the onset of at-risk gambling behaviours.
  • Reduction of stigma in terms of gambling harm and help seeking.
  • Work with a range of professionals to build understanding of gambling as a public health issue, and support available.
  • Builds the capacity of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) organisations to prevent and respond to gambling harm.
  • Expansion of funding for projects that have demonstrated excellence
    Note, this stream is only open to the 17 projects presently funded through the foundation’s current Local Prevention Grants Program, and applicants under this stream must demonstrate how their project aligns with at least one of the other five streams listed above.

For further information on each of the funding streams, see Grants Available section.

About the foundation

The Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation is an independent statutory authority established under legislation by the Victorian Government. The foundation aims to reduce the prevalence of problem gambling, reduce the severity of harm related to gambling, and foster greater understanding and awareness of responsible gambling in the community.

Working within a broad public health framework, the foundation seeks to address gambling-related harm through delivering programs aimed at prevention, education, treatment and support, through conducting research and evaluation, and providing information about gambling regulation and license approval processes.

More information about the foundation is available at www.responsiblegambling.vic.gov.au.

Why focus on the prevention of gambling-related harm?

Harm from gambling can include financial, work or study, health, emotional or psychological, relationships, cultural and criminal activities. Gambling harm not only affects people who gamble and those close to them, but also the broader community.

While problem gambling is associated with a greater severity of harm at the individual level, low and moderate-risk gambling is much more common. Because of this, it accounts for a greater proportion of harm experienced across Victoria. Recent research commissioned by the foundation (Browne et al. 2016) has shown that low and moderate-risk gambling accounts for 84% of the total burden of gambling related harm in Victoria.

For further information see suggested reading which includes the study by Browne et al.

Who can apply?

Applicants must be a single corporate entity such as a not for profit organisation, social enterprise, local government and community or public health organisation. Individuals or sole traders are not eligible to apply.

Please note that all funding must be used for the community benefit and cannot be used to generate a profit for individuals.

Eligibility for this program is restricted to entities with a presence in Victoria. This is consistent with the foundation’s mission to provide prevention, education, information and research, treatment and support services to all Victorians. In determining whether an entity has a presence in Victoria, the foundation will consider this based on the State in which the entity is incorporated.

Please note, where an organisation intends to work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, we will preference funding an organisation that is owned and led by that community. Where the organisation is not owned and led by that community, the organisation will need to provide a letter of support from an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service, Aboriginal Cooperative, or Registered Aboriginal Party, as well as information about the organisation’s previous experience working with that community.

Similarly, for projects working with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse communities, where the applicant is not an organisation that is governed or led by that community/communities, we will require a supporting letter from the local organisation or community group that you aim to work with, as well as information about your organisation’s previous experience working with that community. We encourage applicants to phone the foundation staff listed on the How to Apply section if you have any further questions.

Only one application per organisation will be accepted. Partner organisations can, however, be involved in more than one application.

Grants available

What's on offer?

Over a two-year period, the foundation is offering grants of up to $250,000 (‘tier one’) and $350,000 (‘tier two’), based on both the level of evidence supporting project ideas, and the scale of the projects. Although a maximum funding period of 24 months (1 July 2017 to 30 June 2019) applies to all projects, applicants are welcome to request shorter timeframes where it is appropriate for their project, for example 12 or 18 months.

Please see the terms and conditions within these guidelines for further information on the allocation of funding, and what is meant by ‘scale’ and ‘evidence’.

Funding streams – the detail

The program’s six funding streams align with evidence on the risk factors for gambling harm, identified needs not currently addressed through the foundation’s initiatives, and the foundation’s strategic objectives.

Applicants should refer to the suggested readings which may support your understanding of each of the funding streams.

Applicants should note there are no set funds attached to each of the streams.

  1. Interrupts the normalisation of gambling. This stream has a focus on preventing gambling from becoming a ‘normal activity’ in the community (“normalisation”), particularly in sport, for youth, and through emerging online technologies which are creating more ways for people to gamble. Applicants are not, however, limited to these areas and any project idea that seeks to tackle the normalisation of gambling, for example within a workplace setting, will be considered.
  2. Builds social connectedness and community resilience, to prevent the onset of at-risk gambling behaviours, through targeted actions. Social connectedness is a potential protective factor that mitigates harm from gambling in communities. Applicants applying under this stream should take note to highlight how their project does not duplicate existing initiatives, and provide a clear rationale on how their project connects to the reduction of gambling-related harm in the local community and for at-risk groups.
  3. Reduction of stigma in terms of gambling harm and help seeking. Gambling at its most severe and harmful level is a highly stigmatised issue for those who gamble and their family members. This can prevent individuals and family members from seeking help or talking to someone about their gambling. Projects under this stream will aim to reduce the stigma around gambling, for example through opening a community conversation on the issue and encouraging help seeking.
  4. Work with professionals to build understanding of gambling as a public health issue, and supports available. People experiencing harm from theirs or someone else’s gambling may encounter a range of health and social conditions (sometimes referred to as ‘comorbidities’), for example alcohol and drug use, or mental health issues. Hence, those experiencing harm from gambling may present to a range of professionals e.g. youth services, legal aid, corrections, accountants, family violence. This funding stream aims to respond to this by increase the diversity of sectors who are equipped in understanding gambling as a public health issue, in noticing the signs that a person may be experiencing a problem with gambling, and being able to support them in seeking appropriate help.
  5. Builds the capacity of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) organisations to prevent and respond to gambling harm. Building capacity can include skills and knowledge around understanding gambling harm, and the appropriate supports that are available. There is a particular focus here to fund communities and organisations that are not already supported by the foundation, however applications focusing on any CALD community groups will be considered.
  6. Expansion of funding for projects that have demonstrated excellence (Please note, this stream is only open to the 17 projects presently funded through the foundation’s current Local Prevention Grants Program, and applicants under this stream must demonstrate how their project aligns with at least one of the five streams listed above). Applicants under this stream must be able to demonstrate successful outcomes (from their existing project) and provide a clear rationale to support their need for additional funding to continue and build upon their work.

How to apply

Getting started

Please read the following items:

  1. Part A - Funding guidelines. Please ensure you read and understand these guidelines, with particular focus on the terms and conditions, assessment criteria and definitions.
  2. Part B - Applicant response form.

How to apply

Step 1: Before submitting your application, all applicants need to contact the foundation to provide a brief verbal summary of your project proposal. This must include your project’s aim, target group, setting, approach and to which of the six funding stream it aligns. We ask you to contact us as early in the application period as possible.

Telephone Niamh O’Brien (03) 9452 2636 or Alice Dunt (03) 9452 2607.

Step 2: Complete Part B - Applicant response form

Applicants need to submit their response using the Part B - Applicant response form and email the completed form to the foundation. Please quote your project title and the reference number found on the cover page of these guidelines, in the subject line of your email and send to contact@responsiblegambling.vic.gov.au by 5:00PM AEDT, Tuesday 14 March 2017.

The foundation cannot accept late applications or provide extensions to the closing date.

Key program priorities

Applicants should keep in mind the following key program priorities when preparing their applications – some of which you will notice, are reflected in the assessment criteria (see next section).

  • Innovation – new and innovative approaches to reduce gambling-related harm.
  • Partnerships and co-design – projects that will involve organisations working together in partnership and across sectors, and/or those who have/will continue to co-design their project with the community and stakeholders they aim to target.
  • Avoid duplication – projects that do not duplicate existing activities funded by the foundation.
  • Public health approach – projects that focus on groups, settings and/or life stages that are associated with a greater risk of gambling harm (please refer to the Risk Factors for Problem Gambling background paper).
  • Sustainability/Scalability – projects that can demonstrate strategies to embed and sustain the impact of the project activity beyond the life of the project itself, and/or projects that can demonstrate how its activities and approaches could be adapted for use in other catchment areas, where this is appropriate.

Assessment, evaluation and reporting

Assessment criteria

Applications will be shortlisted internally, and then assessed by a panel consisting of both foundation staff and an external public health expert.

Applications will be assessed against the following assessment criteria, which are detailed further in Part B - Applicant response form.

  1. Project Plan and Alignment (with funding stream) – weighting 25%
  2. Innovation and Partnerships - weighting 25%
  3. Organisational Capability - weighting 25%
  4. Sustainability and/or Scalability - weighting 25%
  5. Value for Money - Applicants will also be assessed overall on value for money.

Evaluation and reporting requirements

  • The foundation will fund an independent evaluation of the overall grants program.
  • Funded agencies will be responsible for undertaking data collection, monitoring and reporting on their projects, including process, impact and outcome measures. Funded agencies will also be required to participate in the overall program evaluation, managed by the independent evaluator, which may include activities such as interviews or surveys.
  • Approvals and sign-off of all project documentation submitted by funded agencies, is the responsibility of the foundation.
  • Please see the table below which further outlines evaluation roles and responsibilities:

Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation

Funded agency

Independent evaluator

Program and project logics and evaluation planning

Work with the independent evaluator to develop templates for project logic and evaluation plan. Provide these to funded agencies.

Approval/ sign-off on final project logics and evaluation plans.

Draft and finalise own project logic and evaluation plan by 29 September 2017.

Regular review of project performance against evaluation plan, with support from the foundation.

Develop overall program logic and evaluation plan in partnership with the foundation.

Regular review of the program evaluation plan.

Collection of data and report writing

Work with the independent evaluator to develop reporting templates and send these to funded agencies.

Provide feedback on funded agencies’ reports.

Approval/sign-off of funded agencies’ reports.

Collect and monitor project data, as per the evaluation and reporting templates.

Participate in interviews, surveys or any other data collection methodologies as required, regarding the overall program effectiveness.

Meet the performance reporting requirements (see section - Project Documentation Requirements).

Work in partnership with the foundation to develop evaluation and performance reporting templates.

Analyse reports from funded agencies to undertake independent project-level evaluation.

Collect additional data required from funded agencies, via interviews, surveys or other methodologies that assesses overall program effectiveness.

Submit reports to the foundation on program and project outcomes, based on the evaluation framework.

Capacity building

Support funded agencies to manage their project monitoring and reporting requirements.

Build the capacity of funded agencies via the foundation’s professional development opportunities (e.g. lunchtime learnings), access to GIRO, and the quarterly forums.

Draw upon the support of the foundation to enhance project data collection and reporting.

Attend quarterly forums.

 

Capacity building

The foundation recognises that successful organisations will have a diverse array of knowledge and skills. To ensure that organisations are well supported in the delivery of their projects the foundation will facilitate a range of capacity building activities for project teams. These include:

  • Access to the foundation’s professional development program.
  • Access to the foundation’s Gambling Information Resource Office (GIRO), which provides information and support to organisations and individuals on a range of topics related to gambling and its regulation in Victoria.
  • Quarterly forums, where project teams will be able to network with other projects, share their learning and participate in tailored knowledge and skill building activities designed to enhance their projects and evaluations.

Project documentation requirements

Successful applicants will be required to complete the following:

  • Attend a mandatory orientation session (mid July 2017)
  • A detailed project work plan (due no later than 29 September 2017)
  • A project logic and evaluation plan – which must align with the overall program evaluation framework, developed by the independent evaluator (due no later than 29 September 2017).
  • Project progress reports, which report on project outcomes and reach, lessons learnt, and expenditure to date (due dates will be determined during contracting and will depend upon the length of each project).
  • A final evaluation and performance report, including overall project outcomes and reach, lessons learnt and final expenditure (due upon completion of the project, or no later than 15 June 2019 – date to be determined during contracting).

Funding conditions

What we will fund

  • Project proposals that align with the funding requirements
  • Costs associated with day to day monitoring of projects, including data collection and reporting, of up to ten per cent of the total submitted budget
  • Overhead surcharges, management costs or administrative fees of up to twenty five per cent of the total submitted budget
  • Reasonable reimbursement of staffing costs for existing employees that are delivering agreed activities, or costs to engage a contractor
  • Design, publication or production costs for materials and collateral where clear foundation branding is included
  • Reasonable advertising or media costs for activity promotions
  • Reasonable costs of facilitation for approved events related to the project, such as catering, facility hire and administrative costs

What we will not fund

  • Applications from non-incorporated entities
  • Capital works
  • Commercial activities that have no community benefit
  • Evaluation of existing policies or programs
  • Applications where the majority of funding is allocated to alternate recreation activities
  • Deficit funding of organisations
  • Activities that are otherwise the funding responsibility of a local, state or the federal government
  • Projects that have already commenced
  • Service delivery not related to the project (e.g. the provision of services that is not required for the purposes of the project)
  • Activities in isolation from the core project (e.g. videos, films, publications, conference or travel)
  • International travel

Suggested reading

Below is a list of suggested reading relating to each of the funding stream areas, followed by some more general resources and links. You may find these helpful in developing your grant application.

1. Interrupts the normalisation of gambling

Thomas, SL, Pitt, H, Bestman, A, Randle, M, Daube, M, Pettigrew, S 2016, Child and parent recall of gambling sponsorship in Australian sport, Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation, Melbourne.(44 pages)

Thomas, SL & Lewis, S 2011, Conceptualisations of gambling risks and benefits: A socio-cultural study of 100 Victorian gamblers.Report for the Victorian Department of Justice.

Deans, E, Thomas, SL Daube, M & Derevensky, J 2016, ‘The role of peer influences on the normalisation of sports wagering: a qualitative study of Australian men’, Addiction Research & Theory, pp. 1–11.

Gordon, R & Chapman, M (2014) Brand community and sports betting in Australia. Victoria, Australia: Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation.

Sally Gainsbury, Alex Russell, Nerilee Hing, Robert Wood, Dan Lubman, Alex Blaszczynski (2013). 'How the internet is changing gambling: findings from an Australian prevalence survey' Journal of Gambling Studies.

2. Builds social connectedness and community resilience, to prevent the onset of at-risk gambling behaviours.

Louise Holdsworth, Elaine Nuske, Nerilee Hing (2013). The relationship between gambling, significant life events, co-morbidity and associated social factors. Victoria, Australia: Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation. (102 pages)

3. Reduction of stigma in terms of gambling harm and help seeking.

Seeking help for gambling problems (Background Paper)

Hing, N., Russell, A., Nuske, E., Gainsbury, S. (2015). The stigma of problem gambling: Causes, characteristics and consequences. Victoria, Australia: Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation. (280 pages – note there is a good summary of key information from this report on the webpage)

Thomas, SL, Bestman, A, Pitt, H, David, J & Thomas, S 2016, Lessons for the development of initiatives to tackle the stigma associated with problem gambling, Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation, Melbourne. (50 pages)

4. Promotes gambling as a public health issue with professionals.

Complex lives: Co-occurring conditions of problem gambling (Background Paper)

Cowlishaw, S (2014). Comorbid problem gambling in substance users seeking treatment. Victoria, Australia: Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation.

5. Builds the capacity of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) organisations to prevent and respond to gambling harm.

Dickins, M., & Thomas, A. (2016). Gambling in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Communities in Australia (AGRC Discussion Paper No. 7). Melbourne: Australian Gambling Research Centre, Australian Institute of Family Studies. (13 pages)

Feldman, S. et. al. (2014). A qualitative investigation of the experiences, attitudes and beliefs about gambling in the Chinese and Tamil communities in Victoria. Victoria, Australia: Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation.

Other suggested reading and useful links:

Using a public health approach in the prevention of gambling related harm (Background Paper)

Risk Factors for Problem Gambling: Environmental, geographic, social cultural, demographic, socio-economic, family and household (Background Paper)

Assessing gambling-related harm in Victoria: a public health perspective, Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation, Melbourne (2016). (188 pages). See the fact sheets at the bottom of this webpage for brief summaries of key information from the report.

Study of gambling and health in Victoria (2014)

Billi, R., Stone, C.A., Marden, P. & Yeung, K. (2014). The Victorian Gambling Study: A longitudinal study of gambling and health in Victoria, 2008-2012. Victoria, Australia: Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation

The foundation’s Gambling Information Resource Office (GIRO) provides information to community groups, local government and the public about gambling and its regulation in Victoria. You can access GIRO here: http://www.responsiblegambling.vic.gov.au/information-and-resources

Short and sharp overviews and explanations of gambling regulation, data, and activities: http://www.responsiblegambling.vic.gov.au/information-and-resources/publications/information-sheets

The GIRO research updates are released every two months and provide a summary of key pieces of research from the gambling field: http://www.responsiblegambling.vic.gov.au/information-and-resources/publications/giro-research-updates

Terms and conditions / Definitions

Terms and conditions

By submitting an application for funds under the Prevention Partnership Program, you agree to be bound by the terms and conditions set out below. The Prevention Partnership Program is being administered by the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation (the foundation). In the event of any inconsistency between promotional and/or marketing materials and these terms and conditions, these terms and conditions take precedence.

Allocation of funding

  1. Over a two-year period, the foundation is offering grants of up to $250,000 (‘tier one’) and $350,000 (‘tier two’), based on the level of evidence supporting project ideas as well as the scale of the projects. Although a maximum funding period of 24 months (1 July 2017 to 30 June 2019) applies to all projects, applicants are welcome to request shorter timeframes where it is appropriate for their project e.g. 12 or 18 months.
  2. Applicants please note that scale and evidence are factors will guide the foundation in awarding final grant budgets, but they don’t predetermine whether a project will be awarded under tier one or two. For example, a project proposal may have a strong evidence base supporting its approach, but if the scale of the project does not warrant funding within tier two, then it will likely be awarded a funding amount that sits under tier one. Conversely, if a project is large in scale but has very little supporting evidence – such as piloting a new intervention - the foundation would likely consider a reduced grant amount within tier one. If Applicants require further guidance in relation to the tiers of funding, we encourage you to contact the foundation staff members listed on the How to Apply section.
  3. In assessing cost effectiveness, the foundation will consider factors such as the activity to staff ratio proposed by the applicant, and the reach and impact of your project.
  4. The foundation will only fund projects that meet the requirements of the funding application and these guidelines, and maintains discretion to withhold available grant funds if there are not sufficient applications or project quality to justify disbursement of the total available amount.
  5. All funding granted must be used for the community benefit and cannot be used to generate a profit for individuals.
  6. Successful applicants will be required to:
    • Deliver Victorian-based activities primarily focused on outcomes that will benefit the Victorian community.
    • Ensure they are not subject to any current or impending legal action that could impact the financial viability of your organisation.
    • Confirm ABN and bank account details for electronic funds transfer.
    • Comply with reporting requirements and evaluation responsibilities as outlined on the Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting section
    • Enter into a contractual agreement (the Funding Agreement) with the foundation.

Conflict of interest

  1. All personnel listed in an application are required to declare any actual, perceived, or potential conflict of interest. Applicants must include signed conflict of interest statements from all proposed personnel as attachments to the Application (Section 7 in the Applicant’s Response form).
  2. Project personnel are required to stipulate that they possess no property, are not engaged in any business, trade or calling that creates a conflict of interest in the work they would conduct as grant recipients for the foundation.
  3. If a conflict of interest (actual, perceived, or potential) is declared or one is considered by the foundation to exist, the foundation may seek independent advice as to how this may or may not affect an application.

Insurance

  1. Grant recipients must maintain adequate levels of professional indemnity insurance, public liability insurance and workers’ compensation insurance. Applicants being considered for funding will be required to provide evidence of their insurance (Section 6 in the Applicant’s Response form).

Collaboration and co-funding

  1. Where multiple organisations are to be involved in delivering a prevention project, these organisations will need to nominate a project lead (the Applicant). The nature of the agreement and arrangements between those involved is a matter for those entities. In all instances, the funding agreement will be between the foundation and the Applicant, and the Applicant is legally responsible for delivering the project.
  2. Applicants are permitted to source additional funding (co-funding) from other bodies to deliver a prevention project. The nature and extent of any co-funding arrangement, needs to be detailed in the financial section (section 5) of Part B – Applicant response form, including the full name and ABN (if relevant) of the funder and supporting evidence of the availability of the funding.

Publications and media comment

  1. The foundation will issue a media release about the successful applications, in consultation with those agencies. Any other media releases or publications in relation to a successful application must be reviewed by the foundation before they are issued. The foundation must also be consulted in relation to any media comment a grant recipient intends to make as a result of the prevention project.
  2. The foundation intends to publish information about the prevention partnership projects. The foundation will work with successful applicants to ensure the accuracy of any published information regarding the prevention projects, case studies and/or examples of best practice highlights.
  3. Successful applicants will be required to comply with all of the foundation’s media, branding and web guidelines, including acknowledgement of the foundation’s Prevention Partnership Program in all communications.

Definitions

The purpose of this section is to provide a definition (proposed by the foundation) on key concepts we have used within these funding guidelines and in Part B - Applicant response form

‘Funding agreement’ means a funding agreement between the foundation and a Successful Organisation for the provision of a grant to implement the Project.

‘Application’ means the Part B - Applicant response form made by an organisation to participate in the program.

‘Assessment criteria’ means the criteria set out on the Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting section, and within the Part B - applicant response form.

‘Co-design’ refers to an approach to project design, which attempts to actively involve all stakeholders and community (for whom the project is intended) in the design process, to help ensure the result meets their needs.

Foundation’s website’ refers to the foundation’s website www.responsiblegambling.vic.gov.au

‘Guidelines’ means this document, Part A - Funding guidelines, available at www.responsiblegambling.vic.gov.au/preventiongrants

‘Innovation’ can mean a new idea, initiative and/or partnership that offers a fresh approach to an issue. Successful innovation involves learning from what is already known or exists and building upon it, rather than reinventing the wheel. In relation to the Prevention Partnership Program, applicants might demonstrate innovation through adapting or building upon current projects, or they may come up with a creative new idea to reduce and prevent gambling-related harm affecting Victorians.

‘Successful application/applicant’ means an application/applicant that is selected by the foundation which will result in the foundation providing a grant to a successful organisation.

‘Successful organisation’ means an organisation whose application is selected by the foundation as a successful application.

‘Scalability’ means the capacity of your proposed project, and its knowledge, tools and resources, to be adapted and used by others, where appropriate.

‘Sustainability’ means the potential for your proposed project and any strategies that will embed and sustain its impact throughout and beyond the life of the project.

‘The foundation’ refers to the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation, a statutory authority established under the Victorian Responsible Gambling Foundation Act 2011, ABN 72 253 301 291, of 14-20 Blackwood Street, North Melbourne 3051

‘The program’ refers to the foundation’s Prevention Partnership Program.

‘You, Your’ means the organisation who intends to, or has submitted an application.

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